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Ko Un - First Person Sorrowful

Until his remarkable performance at the Aldeburgh Poetry Festival in November 2012, Ko Un was largely unknown in Britain. This is all the more surprising, as Ko Un is a major international poet and human rights activist, now approaching his 81st birthday.

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Date: 16 March 2014

Michael Farrell - Open Sesame

The first thing you notice about the poems in Open Sesame is a colloquial familiarity. At the same time the poems are often dense and use an unstable grammar. In some of them there’s a distinctive parlance going on: not just Australian but regional and possibly generational (I mean here the adult generation around the time of Farrell’s country childhood). Farrell is an agile performer. You feel there’s a language being created here and yet it’s your own language.

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Date: 16 March 2014

Visual Poetics Show, Saison Poetry Library

When you walk through the glass doors that mark the boundary of the Saison Poetry Library from the rest of the Southbank Centre in London, immediately to your left is a pocket of the library where the curators David Miller and Chris McCabe have installed their Visual Poetics show. On wall, in plinth and cabinet and on screen, work by over 30 artists, from the seminal to the au courant, is displayed, giving a pithy survey of a little observed and infrequently celebrated art form.

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Date: 15 March 2014

Pam Brown – Home by Dark

Pam Brown owns, I think, a genre splitter. Her mode of collage is not so much disjunctive as it is like Mike Goldberg use of Sardines in Frank O’Hara’s ‘Why I am not a painter’: ‘Yes, it needed something there’.

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Date: 15 March 2014

David Lloyd – Arc and Sill

David Lloyd’s Arc & Sill gathers poems from five different books spanning the period of 1979 to 2009. …  John Wilkinson describes a ‘constellated elegance’ in Lloyd’s writing in his review of [the book]

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Date: 15 March 2014

Fred D'Aguiar – The Rose of Toulouse

Fred D’Aguiar’s journey has been one of the strangest in British West Indian poetry. His themes of conflicted identity, displacement by slavery, colonialism, outsiderdom, migration and racism seem to have been accepted by him from without, as an inherited territory from previous generations of Caribbean writers, and yet he has mostly approached them with the calm, poised implacability of a modernist-inflected mainstream English verse that seems, at first blush, to be at odds with the implied violence of the social and historical torsions of this subject-matter.

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Date: 15 March 2014

C.D. Wright – One With Others (A Little Book of Her Days)

C. D. Wright’s One With Others (A Little Book of Her Days) finds us in an American South that will be recognisable to readers of William Faulkner: the imaginary but real country of immutable identities and hierarchies, mysterious solidarities around hidden crimes, and stubborn back-looking ghosts hankering after old pains and certainties.
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Date: 15 March 2014

John Ashbery – Quick Question

Since turning 60, John Ashbery has published thirteen books of poems, three prose collections, and book-length translations of Reverdy and Rimbaud (with volumes of selected French prose and poetry translations on the way), and has twice exhibited collages at the Tibor de Nagy Gallery.

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Date: 15 March 2014

Amy Cutler – Nostalgia Forest

A past meaning of the word ‘nostalgia’ describes a severe homesickness, a medical condition brought on by an acute longing for home. In Nostalgia Forest Amy Cutler brings the body back into the condition of nostalgia, connecting physical affliction and remembrance.

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Date: 15 March 2014

Daniel Tiffany – Brick Radio

What happens to the ‘shifters’ ‘I’ and ‘you’ when—well, when they don’t cease to shift? This is the question, and aesthetic predicament, with which a reader is continually confronted in Daniel Tiffany’s Brick Radio.
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Date: 15 March 2014

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