Latest Releases

 
Andrés Sánchez Robayna  The Book, Behind the Dune

Translated from Spanish by Louis Bourne. 
Published January 2017. Paperback, 134pp, 9 x 6ins, £9.95 / $18
ISBN 9781848615229 [Download a sample PDF from this book here.]

 

 Poetry Book Society Recommended Translation for the First Quarter, 2017.

  The Book, Behind the Dune is a long unitary poem about the birth of a poetic consciousness and its development in a world marked by the discovery of beauty, eroticism and the reality of evil. Influenced by St. Augustine, The Cloud of Unknowing and Wordsworth’s The Prelude, the poem, full of literary, artistic and philosophical references, is simultaneously a meditation on the meaning of time and its manifestations—its epiphanies—in a concrete life. The reflection on historical time leads the poet to the reality of “the pain of the world,” but also towards a world that is incessantly and continually beginning. As Yves Bonnefoy puts it, “Sánchez Robayna knows what ‘the new time’ expects of us which Rimbaud foresaw as ‘very severe’.”
 
Cover of Andres Sanchez Robayna - The Book, Behind the Dune
 
Peter Robinson  Collected Poems 1976-2016

Published February 2017. Paperback, 518pp, 9 x 6ins, £19.95 / $32
ISBN 9781848615243 [Download a sample PDF from this book here.]

Collected Poems 1976–2016 gathers carefully chosen and reviewed texts from Peter Robinson’s nine books of poetry, to which is added a newly completed tenth collection. They include his early experiments in northern social realism, and domestic interiors coloured by the experience of sexual violence, explored in the seven lyrics that form part two of This Other Life. Here are his dialogues with Italian poetry and culture, and unforeseen encounters with Japan, all in relation to the historical vicissitudes of his home country, and the landscapes in a much-revisited Liverpool. For the Small Mercies, published here for the first time, completes a triptych of books written since Robinson’s return after nearly two decades of working in Kyoto and Sendai, a return that, coinciding with the global financial crisis and onset of austerity culture, provided occasions for further reflections on the economic motifs of his earliest poems.

Cover of Peter Robinson - Collected Poems
 
Elaine Randell  The Meaning of Things

Published February 2017. Paperback, 134pp, 8.5 x 5.5ins, £9.95 / $18
ISBN 9781848615144 [Download a sample PDF from this book here.]

‘Elaine Randell’s writing was jump-started early by the outpouring of experimental small-press poetry and publishing that accompanied the emergence of pop art. That movement drew attention to the art–life divide by reducing it to a sharp but casual edginess. The poetry associated with this moment adopted informal means to freshen its reader relations across the same frontier. Randell’s subsequent career in social work and psychotherapy has found her firmly on the side of life. The poems in The Meaning of Things, though making no such claims for their acts, are alive with the clear feeling, ethical tact, and rhythmical skill required to move rapidly back and forth along that borderline.’ —Peter Robinson 

Cover of Elaine Randell - The Meaning of Things
 
Mervyn Taylor  Voices Carry

Published February 2017. Paperback, 100pp, 9 x 6ins, £9.95 / $17
ISBN 9781848614970 [Download a sample PDF from this book here.]

The Master Portrait Painter, Mervyn Taylor, is visiting his old haunts, the island he has sketched time and again with indelible ink, the Brooklyn of his residence in exile, and the journey back and forth, the poet returning to fill up his paint bottles, to recount the stories of voices that carry from dreams, memories, the Port of Spain that has changed forever and yet remains the city that is his own. 
     In this new collection, that is at the same time as old as the eternal truths he tells, we celebrate the voices the poet hears: we see him walk beside the Savannah, people calling out, hello Uncle, Daddy; we lament the turning of green places into dangerous fields, and we cry quietly while accompanying “the boy walking with his broken kite/to find the old Indian who bought him/the thread, to tell him how well it flew.”
—Indran Amirthanayagam
Cover of Mervyn Taylor - Voices Carry
 
Richard Georges  Make Us All Islands

Published February 2017. Paperback, 86pp, 9 x 6ins, £9.95 / $17
ISBN 9781848615274 [Download a sample PDF from this book here.]

"Singing ‘light into bleakness,’ in vivid poetic language that shakes us out of apathy, Georges’ harsh and lyrical hymns portray the painful beauty of the Virgin Islands and Caribbean archipelago. Searching wherever indelible traces of history may be found, in the undersea abyss of multiple shipwrecks, cholera coasts, accounts of disaster and cruel murder, hillside ruins, heaps of stones, and shifting sands, the poet brings us ancestral stories of the women of the slave ships, fishermen, migrant seasonal workers, cane cutters, cocolos, coal burners, domino players and family members who at great cost and risk have endured. If history divides us, these poems of the past and present, as strong as boiling bush and as honest as jumbie truths, have the power to revive, and, perhaps, even, connect us." —Loretta Collins Klobah

Cover of Richard Georges - Make Us All Islands
 
Alfred Celestine  Weightless Word — Selected Poems

Edited by David Miller & Richard Leigh
Published February 2017. Paperback, 118pp, 9 x 6ins, £9.95 / $18

ISBN 9781848615281 [Download a sample PDF from this book here.]

Alfred Celestine was born in Los Angeles in 1949 and came to London in 1977, remaining there until his death in 2009. He published two books of poetry: Confessions of Nat Turner (The Many Press, 1978) and Passing Eliot in the Street (Nettle Press, 2003). Weightless Word is easily the most comprehensive selection of his poetry to date, revealing his range and power as a poet.

Cover of Alfred Celestine — Weightless Word — Selected Poems
 
John Muckle   Falling Through — a novel

Published February 2017. Paperback, 232pp, 8.5 x 5.5ins, £12.95 / $20
ISBN 9781848615359 [Download a sample PDF from this book here.]

Graham Bartlett is a private English tutor. He lives in North London and travels to meet numerous teenage clients. He is a lonely person, unable to find steady work, but does his best to survive and deliver sound lessons to a large number of youngsters, diving in and out of their homes with a battered satchel on his shoulder, glimpsing their families and backgrounds. Browsing the internet he discovers an unpleasant murder has occurred in the quiet suburban avenue where he grew up. The horrific discovery of a woman’s callously disposed-of body half-interests him whilst seeming to have little to do with his own life, apart from accidents of place and memory. Intertwined with his peripatetic journeys across a cityscape marked by recent riots are the stories of people he has known, or imagines, or has actual dealings with in the present. 
      Falling Through is a novel of encounters and evasions: north of the Thames, south of hell.
Cover of John Muckle - Falling Through